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CAN YOU understand these people?

In this lesson Sts revise some important uses of the present
perfect and how the present perfect contrasts with th the past
simple. They also learn conmmon words and phrases to talk
about money.
The lesson begins with a song which has a rather cynical
view of certain kind of male and female views
money. This provides a lead-in to the vocabulary focus
which is followed by a pronunciation spot on different
pronunciations of the letter o. The new lexis is consolidated
through reading and listening activities which ask Are you a
spender or a saver?
ln the second half of the lesson, adialogue where two
people are arguing about money provides the context for
the grammar revision. Finally, Sts read and talk about
the true story about a man who became a successful
businessn1an without being able to read or write.

Listen to a song about money – page 14

2A 1.35 Vocabulary Bank

2A 1.36 Vocabulary Bank

2A 1.37 Vocabulary Bank

2A 1.38 Pronunciation

2A 1.39 Pronunciation

2A 1.40 Listening

ARE YOU A SPENDER
ORA SAVER? 2A Reading 3

2A 1.41 Grammar

THE MILLIONAIRE
WITH A SECRET 2A Reading 6

2A 1.42 Grammar Bank

2A 1.43 Grammar Bank

2A 1.44 Grammar Bank

2A 1.45 listening

2A 1.46 Listening

ln this lesson Sts revise the present perfect (with for
and since) and they are introduced to the present perfect
continuous. The context is provided by the story of a
British family whose holiday to Uganda changed their lives
and led them to set up a charity to help build a new school
for orphan children.
The lesson begins with an interview with Jane
Cadwallader, one of the founder members of the charity
Adedante África. Then sentences from the listening are
used to contextualize the grammar presentation. This
is followed by a pronunciation focus on sentence stress
in present perfect continuous sentences and a speaking
activity where Sts put the gramrnar into practice.
In the second half of the lesson, Sts read and Iisten to the
story of a BBC presenter who kayaked down the Amazon to
raise money for charity. Both the lexical and pronunciation
focus in this part of the lesson is on using strong adjectives,
like furious and exhausted. The lesson finishes with a writing
activity where Sts write an informal email.

2B 1.47 Grammar Bank

2B 1.48 Grammar Bank

2B 1.49 Pronunciation

2B 1.50 Pronunciation

2B 1.51 Listening

2B 1.52 Listening

2B 1.53 Vocabulary and Pronunciation

CAN YOU UNDERSTAND THIS TEXT?

2B 1.47 Grammar Bank

2B 1.48 Grammar Bank

2B 1.49 Pronunciation

2B 1.50 Pronunciation

2B 1.51 Listening

2B 1.52 Listening

2B 1.53 Vocabulary and Pronunciation

TV presenter’s Amazon / 2B Reading

1+2 R&C Reading

Emma
I = interviewer, E = Emma
I What do you like eating when you're feeling a bit down?
E Chocolate, I think it's very, a bit of a cliche, but I'm a girl and I like chocolate, and that's probably where I go to. Or ice cream as 'Nell, chocolate ice cream is probably the ideal, the ideal food.
I Does it make you feel better?
E It makes me feel better temporarily, when it's in my mouth, but
then about ten minutes later I usually feel quite sick.
Andrew
I= interviewer, A = Andrew
I How often do you eat out?
A Lately I've been eating out a lot, but I try not to eat out to save money.
What kind of places do you go to?
A I like any kind of Asian food, and st eak is good, but it's kind of expensive.
I Why do you like t hese kinds of restaurants?
A I like them because they're different. I like to cook, and the food is different from the things that I know how to make.
Ben
I = interviewer, B = Ben
I Do you have brothers and sisters?
B I've got one brother. He's four years younger than me.
I How well do you get on with him?
B Oh, very well, very well. We went to school together, we rowed
together, we've done sport together. we've been on holiday
together. So yeah, we get on well.
Zenobia
I = interviewer, Z =Zenobia
I Are you a spender or a saver?
z I'm a very big spender.
I Can you give examples?
Z Bags. I have a weakness for bags. I love designer bags, and
when I see somet hing in the shops which is on sale, and it's half
price or reduced, all my savings for the last three months will
go on that item. So bags is a weakness - bags, bags, bags.
Simone
I= interviewer, S = Simone
I Have you ever taken part in a charity event?
S Yes, when I was younger I took part in a charity bike ride, and I
cycled round a park for as long as I could, and I earned quite a
lot of money, for an eight-year-old, to do that.
I What was it for?
S It was arranged by a TV show called Blue Peter and it was for
their charity, so I don't know where they spent the money, but it
was for Blue Peter.
I How much money did you raise?
S About £100 roughly, when I was about eight, so that was nice.
Oxfam
Hi, I’m Louise, and this is Oxford. Oxford is a beautiful city that’s most famous for its historic university. But there’s a lot more to Oxford than just an old University. The city is also the
birthplace of another world-famous organisation: Oxfam –a charity that has been helping people in need since the 1940s.
The Oxford Committee for Famine relief was set up in 1942. The charity, which soon became known as Oxfam, encouraged people to donate food and clothing to help the people of Europe who were
suffering during the Second World War.
The British people were very generous and after the end of the war, Oxfam continued to raise money to relieve suffering caused by wars and disasters around the world.
This is the Oxfam shop at 17 Broad Street, Oxford, a small shop on one of Oxford’s busiest streets. In 1947, this shop became the first permanent charity shop in the UK – and it’s still going strong today.
Charity shops are great when you haven’t got much money and you need to give your credit cards a
rest. They are full of cheap second-hand clothes, books, music, and many other things that people
have donated. For someone like me they are the perfect place for a low-cost shopping spree. And,
most importantly, none of the money you spend here is ever wasted –it all goes to support a very good cause.
Today Oxfam has more than 1,200 charity shops all over the world, and 750 of them are in the UK.
Today I’m meeting Joan Massey, who has volunteered at Oxfam for 15 years, since she retired.
'What kind of things do people donate?'
'Well, mostly clothes, household goods, and, er, some years ago there was a donkey donated. Er, it had a tag around its neck saying ‘I’m for sale’ and it had been sold within ten minutes.'
Oxfam has changed a lot in seventy years and the small charity that started in this tiny shop now has its headquarters here –just outside Oxford on the Cowley Road. Today Oxfam is an international
charity working in more than 92 countries around the world and helping over 15 million people every year.
This is the headquarters of Oxford GB, the British division of Oxfam. About 700 staff work here, but
Oxford GB also employs almost 6,000 employees working in 70 different countries.
Oxfam does amazing work around the world, and none of it would be possible without the help of its volunteers, the generosity of individuals donating money and goods to the charity, and even people
like me who love shopping for bargains!

Extra Reading